Bill Murray-Sofia Coppola Reteam ‘On The Rocks’ Hits Theaters Next Friday

Movies

It really hasn’t been broadcasted widely, but Sofia Coppola’s latest dramedy from Apple/A24, On the Rocksis opening in key markets next weekend, Oct. 2. I hear it will be a very limited run followed by a debut on the AppleTV+ streaming service on Oct. 23.

The movie made its world premiere at the New York Film Festival and out of the gate scored a 78% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes from 23 reviews to date.

Lost in Translation Oscar winner Coppola reteams with that film’s leading man Bill Murray for a story about a female New York author (Rashida Jones) with writer’s block and marriage problems who reconnects with her aging playboy dad (Murray). Lost in Translation was nominated for four Oscars including Best Picture and Best Actor Murray, and won Coppola an Original Screenplay trophy. The movie scored three Golden Globe wins for Best Motion Picture Comedy/Musical, Best Actor Murray in a Comedy/Musical and Screenplay. The movie back in 2003 grossed over $118.7M WW.

Deadline’s Pete Hammond exclaimed that On the Rocks, “is more than just a riotously funny, wonderfully witty and smart film — it is a much needed one. Coppola’s movie is also a bit of a pre-pandemic valentine to New York City, a reminder of the Big Apple’s pure joy, and even without Bill Murray to light it up that would probably be enough.”

This morning, Deadline broke the news that Apple Original Films scored the Russo brothers-first directed movie post Avengers: Endgame, Cherry starring Tom Holland, for a deal in the high $40Ms. The feature is planned an awards season entry for this upcoming season, 2020-21.

Please share this page!

Articles You May Like

Wendy Stuart Kaplan and Steven Bloomer-Teague Host TriVersity Talk! Sunday at 7 PM ET With Featured Guest Jaye McBride
‘Ghostbusters: Afterlife’ Release Date Shifts To Summer 2021; ‘Don’t Breathe’ Sequel Set
Shygirl Announces New Alias EP, Shares SOPHIE-produced “Slime”: Stream
Cannibals and Carpet Fitters (2017)
What Is ‘O Willow Waly’? The Haunting of Bly Manor Song, Explained